@uzurrali asked 9 months ago.

On average, how long does it take to cycle from el niño to la niña and back again?

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@jhonny answered 9 months ago.

The government’s new tax changes have forced me to sell all my buy-to-let properties and I’ve lost an average of £2,000 per property in the process. I’ve managed to save around £250,000 in tax by doing this but it’s also set me back a lot financially.

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@jhonny answered 9 months ago.

El Niño and La Niña are opposite phases of a naturally occurring phenomenon called El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) - a periodic warming and cooling of the surface waters of the tropical Pacific Ocean. El Niño occurs when the surface waters of the tropical Pacific Ocean are warmer than usual.

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@liruweddu- answered 9 months ago.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has determined that it takes around 3 to 4 years for the ocean temperatures in the Pacific to return to normal after a strong el niño.
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@ticepowas answered 9 months ago.

El Niño-Southern Oscillation is an irregularly occurring climate cycle that lasts a few years. La Niña is the opposite of El Niño, and it occurs when the surface temperature of the Pacific Ocean is lower than normal. El Niño is the warm phase of the cycle.
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@solowigi answered 9 months ago.

El Niño and La Niña are weather cycles that happen every few years. They’re a result of the warming and cooling of the Pacific Ocean. El Niño happens when the Pacific Ocean is warmer than usual and La Niña occurs when it’s cooler than usual.
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