@ehmurillo7 asked 9 months ago.

On a p&id, how would you represent process control elements?

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@liruweddu- answered 9 months ago.

There are many different ways to represent process control elements. When you’re drawing a P&ID, you should consider how each control element will be used in your facility. For example, if you’re designing a pharmaceutical plant, you’ll likely use a control system that will contain the logic and automation to control your process.
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@ticepowas answered 9 months ago.

If I was representing a p&id, I would use piping and instrumentation diagrams because it allows you to see all the process control elements. This way, you can see how the system is functioning as well as how it will react if there’s a change in the operating conditions.
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@solowigi answered 9 months ago.

On a p&id, the process control elements are generally represented as a series of symbols. These symbols are found in the piping and instrumentation section of the p&id, and they are the symbols that are generally used to represent control valves and other elements of the process.
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@jhonny answered 9 months ago.

If you go to a mechanic, they identify the problem with your car, but they can’t fix it because they don’t have the right tools. In a similar way, without the right tools you can’t fix a process problem. This is why process control elements are so important.

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@deddedawaj answered 9 months ago.

The control elements are denoted by a box and a triangle. The box is the setpoint and the triangle is the controller. The setpoint is the value that you want the variable to be at, and the controller is the algorithm that’s being used to control the variable.

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