@dqcipriano16 asked 7 months ago.

If star a has 4 times the temperature of star b, how much more energy is star a outputting?

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@Davidd answered 7 months ago.

The difference between the temperatures of the 2 stars is 4 times the difference between the 2 star’s luminosities. In other words, the difference in temperature between the 2 stars is 4 times larger than the difference in luminosity.

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@ojyfucex answered 7 months ago.

The total energy output of a star is directly related to its surface temperature. According to Stefan-Boltzmann’s law, the total energy output of a star is directly proportional to the fourth power of its temperature.
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@uttyttuvod answered 7 months ago.

A star’s luminosity, or total energy output, is related to its surface temperature through a formula called the Stefan-Boltzmann Law. The Stefan-Boltzmann Law states that the total energy output, or luminosity, of a star is proportional to the temperature to the fourth power.
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@icesime answered 7 months ago.

The temperature of a star is directly related to its output of energy. The relationship is based on what’s called the Stefan-Boltzmann equation which states that energy output is proportional to the fourth power of temperature. This means that a star that’s four times as hot as another star will have 16 times the energy output.
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@nesyffikuxi answered 7 months ago.

If star A has 4 times the temperature of star B, then you can use the Stefan-Boltzmann law to determine that star A’s luminosity is 4 times that of star B.

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