@btmadico19 asked 8 months ago.

How much of a published work, such as a textbook, can you legally copy?

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@makuzalletto answered 8 months ago.

The short answer is: you can copy any part of it that’s not covered by copyright. But what’s covered by copyright, and what’s not, is complicated, so if you have any doubt, you should get a lawyer’s opinion. Copyright protection begins the moment the work is created.
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@zadebyla answered 8 months ago.

You can copy as much as you want as long as you’re not making a profit. If you’re not making a profit, then you’re not making money off of the work. If you’re not making money off of the work, you’re not making copies of it.
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@ilolawe answered 8 months ago.

Is there any length of a work that a student can use to avoid paying for the whole work? The answer to these questions depends on the type of use and how the copyright owner chooses to enforce his or her rights.
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@kazidderinn answered 8 months ago.

It's always good to cite your sources and credit the original author, but it's important to understand how much of a work you're legally allowed to copy. There's no hard and fast rule on how much you can legally copy because the amount you can legally use depends on whether you are using the content for commercial or noncommercial purposes.
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@gofusettunna answered 8 months ago.

The general rule of thumb is that you can only copy up to 10% of a published work without asking permission from the author. The reason for this is that copyright law protects the expression of an idea but not the idea itself. In other words, it protects the way in which the idea was expressed but not the idea itself.

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