@ehcintrano7 asked 6 months ago.

How are chromatophores in the cells of the skin of a cuttlefish used for communication?

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@jackyy answered 5 months ago.

Chromatophores are cells that produce color, of which many types are pigment-containing cells, or groups of cells, found in a wide range of animals including amphibians, fish, reptiles, crustaceans and cephalopods. Mammals and birds, in contrast, have a class of cells called melanocytes for coloration.

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@Juliann answered 5 months ago.

Another characteristic shared by cephalopods is their amazing ability to communicate through the use of chromatophoresChromatophores are pigment-bearing cells capable of causing color changes in the cephalopodsskin by expanding and contracting. ... Chromatophores can express yellow, orange, brown, red, blue and black.

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@Gaurii answered 6 months ago.

Chromatophores are cells that produce color, of which many types are pigment-containing cells, or groups of cells, found in a wide range of animals including amphibians, fish, reptiles, crustaceans and cephalopods. Mammals and birds, in contrast, have a class of cells called melanocytes for coloration.
Chromatophores are largely responsible for generating skin and eye colour in ectothermic animals and are generated in the neural crest during embryonic development.

That triggers a signal from the brain to other cells, called chromatophores, which initiate the change in hue. Some contain sacs of various pigments. In animals such as the octopus, squid or cuttlefish, colour changes when a complex network of muscles adjusts the sizes and positions of different sacs within the skin.

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